TRANSFORMING MID-LEVEL PROFESSIONALS INTO CONFIDENT COMMUNICATORS AND LEADERS

Feedback Builds Relationships
Published 01 April 2022
Feedback Builds Relationships | Amy Jackson - Nurturing Confidence
When leaders begin coaching with me, one of the processes we often use is for the coach to have some feedback conversations with the leader’s peers, team members and senior leaders.

This allows the community around the leader to support their development through frank feedback that they might not have the skills to share directly. Through the coaching process we share the themes of that feedback with the leader, and support the leader, and their community, to develop the skills that will support them to have those frank, and kind, feedback conversations that support everyone involved to improve the way they work together.

Whilst initially confronting in concept, all the leaders I work with value this part of the process and recognise the gift that the feedback brings them, in supporting the development of their self-awareness and in turn their capacity for self-leadership.
It is often one of the core pieces that they reflect on with much gratitude at the end of their coaching experience, and the strengthening of relationships is something that benefits the individuals and the organisation within which they work.

Whose feedback would help you grow as a leader this year?

  • Sometimes asking the person who we least want to hear it from brings us the most valuable learning.
  • Sometimes feedback helps us shift our perception of ourselves or others.
  • Often it helps us build our confidence.

I encourage you to think about what are the questions you could ask that would most help you grow as a leader? What are the self-doubts about your leadership that could be addressed as a question to help you understand others perceptions of the situational impact? What are the strengths that you don’t see others valuing about your leadership?

Craft some questions, ask some key people if they would be willing to give you some feedback. Share the questions with them, give them time to think, make it as easy as possible for them to share their thoughts with you. Some will want to meet with you, others to write them for you, others still to go through someone more skilled in providing feedback.

I know it feels really uncomfortable and scary to do.
And I promise it will help you grow your confidence and skills as a communicator and as a leader.
Feedback Builds Relationships
Published 01 April 2022
When leaders begin coaching with me, one of the processes we often use is for the coach to have some feedback conversations with the leader’s peers, team members and senior leaders.

This allows the community around the leader to support their development through frank feedback that they might not have the skills to share directly. Through the coaching process we share the themes of that feedback with the leader, and support the leader, and their community, to develop the skills that will support them to have those frank, and kind, feedback conversations that support everyone involved to improve the way they work together.

Whilst initially confronting in concept, all the leaders I work with value this part of the process and recognise the gift that the feedback brings them, in supporting the development of their self-awareness and in turn their capacity for self-leadership.
It is often one of the core pieces that they reflect on with much gratitude at the end of their coaching experience, and the strengthening of relationships is something that benefits the individuals and the organisation within which they work.

Whose feedback would help you grow as a leader this year?

  • Sometimes asking the person who we least want to hear it from brings us the most valuable learning.
  • Sometimes feedback helps us shift our perception of ourselves or others.
  • Often it helps us build our confidence.

I encourage you to think about what are the questions you could ask that would most help you grow as a leader? What are the self-doubts about your leadership that could be addressed as a question to help you understand others perceptions of the situational impact? What are the strengths that you don’t see others valuing about your leadership?

Craft some questions, ask some key people if they would be willing to give you some feedback. Share the questions with them, give them time to think, make it as easy as possible for them to share their thoughts with you. Some will want to meet with you, others to write them for you, others still to go through someone more skilled in providing feedback.

I know it feels really uncomfortable and scary to do.
And I promise it will help you grow your confidence and skills as a communicator and as a leader.